No surgery for smokers or the obese

UK came up with a policy to cut down costs.  Could this policy be coming to US?  The policy is based aggressive measure to deal with cause of a plethora of diseases and health conditions affecting people worldwide: smoking and obesity.

A health committee in the UK has announced a controversial policy “to support patients whose health is at risk from smoking or being very overweight.”
For an indefinite amount of time, it plans to ban access to routine, or non-urgent, surgery under the National Health Service until patients “improve their health,” the policy states, claiming that “exceptional clinical circumstances (will) be taken into account on a case-by-case basis.”
The time frame for improving health is set at nine months for the obese in particular; those with a body mass index over 40 must reduce the number by 15% over that time period, and those with a BMI over 30 are given a target of 10%.
The target for smokers is eight weeks or more without a cigarette — with a breath test to prove it.
The new and most controversial part of the policy is that the surgery ban is indefinite, according to the Royal College of Surgeons in the UK, which opposes the policy. Other groups in the UK have implemented similar policies, but patients eventually get surgery if they are unable to lose weight or stop smoking, they said.
“The guidance for (general practitioners) and providers has been in place since 2011 for hip and knee operations and was extended in 2012 to all non-urgent routine referrals,” the East and North Hertfordshire CCG said.
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Could This Leg Band Replace Pain Pills?

Chronic pain is difficult to live with and, often, difficult to relieve. Pain medications may help, but they also come with some hefty side effects. At-home remedies such as warming and cooling gels or other muscle relaxants can also work, but the soothing effects don’t last long. So what’s a person living with pain to do? The Quell band claims to be the answer.

The Quell leg band is a device that can be worn on your upper calf. It’s very discreet, but the relief it brings will definitely catch your attention.

Quell comes equipped with an electrode that delivers transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). This method uses electronic signals to stimulate the body enough so that it no longer notices pain. This type of stimulation is said to be good for all kinds of pain relief, including arthritis and lower back pain.

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How Electricity Could Replace Opioids In Treating Chronic Pain

After a number of surgeries and drugs failed to relieve the mind-numbing pain,   Lori Swearingen discovered the answer: an implantable device called a neuromodulator.

Such implants are now part of a big business that could well someday do the job of opioids and other medications for treating pain. All told, it’s estimated to be a $3.9 billion total addressable market this year, Needham analyst Mike Matson wrote in a recent note to clients.

Neuromodulation essentially tricks the brain into thinking a region of the body is no longer in pain, says Dr. Allen Burton, Abbott’s medical director for neuromodulation, movement disorders and pain. The modern iteration is the result of a better understanding of the nervous system.

Matson expects the neuromodulation market to grow in the upper-single digit range for the next few years. The leader in the space is Medtronic ( MDT ) with 52.3% of the market, while Abbott Laboratories ( ABT ) and Boston Scientific ( BSX ) on its heels, Matson says.

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Survival Guide for Back Pain Surgery Recovery

I would like to share information about a countdown sale for those who are thinking about back surgery. This information is supplement to what the doctors told me about surgery – it goes over what to expect in terms of pain and physical limitations, what mobility and hygiene tools made recovery easier, what exercises were most helpful, how to prepare the house for someone after surgery, what to bring to the hospital and so forth. Just practical stuff I wish I knew about before hand. Prepare for faster & easier recovery from back surgery Learn on experience of someone who has been thu it #BackPain

Back pain? Considering surgery? Get your the survival guide – Amazon countdown deal!

I would like to share information about a countdown sale for those who are thinking about back surgery. This information is supplement to what the doctors told me about surgery – it goes over what to expect in terms of pain and physical limitations, what mobility and hygiene tools made recovery easier, what exercises were most helpful, how to prepare the house for someone after surgery, what to bring to the hospital and so forth. Just practical stuff I wish I knew about before hand. Prepare for faster & easier recovery from back surgery Learn on experience of someone who has been thu it #BackPain

When your back or head aches, which pain relievers work, and how safe are they?

Acetaminophen (Tylenol and generic) is available OTC.

Best use: For mild to moderate pain, such as headaches and osteoarthritis. Acetaminophen is gentler on the stomach than NSAIDs are, thus a good ­option for people with acid reflux or ulcers. It also won’t ­increase heart attack and stroke risk, as NSAIDs may.

Safety smarts: Our experts recommend no more than 3,250 milligrams a day. Taking more or mixing it with alcohol can damage your liver. In rare cases, acetaminophen can cause serious skin reactions that may include blisters or a rash. If that occurs, stop taking it and seek immediate medical attention.

NSAIDs

NSAIDs are available in OTC and prescription-strength versions of aspirin (Bayer, Bufferin and generic), ibuprofen (Advil and generic) and naproxen (Aleve and generic). Prescription-only meds include cele­coxib (Cel­ebrex and ­generic) and diclo­fenac (Cambia, Voltaren and generic).

Best use: For mild to moderate pain such as headaches and muscle aches, and to manage osteoarthritis. If an OTC doesn’t bring relief, your doctor might prescribe a higher-dose version.

Safety smarts: Take the lowest dose for the shortest period of time — and for pain, for no longer than 10 days without talking to your doctor. If you use OTC NSAIDs three or more times weekly, ask your doctor about other options. NSAIDs can hike the risk of stomach and intestinal bleeding and ulcers, particularly if used regularly in high doses or if you combine one NSAID with another. If you have heart disease, heart disease risk factors, gastrointestinal bleeding, ulcers or risk factors for ulcers, ask your doctor what you should take.

Opioids

These prescription drugs include fentanyl (Actiq, Abstral, Duragesic, Fentora, Onsolis and generic), hydrocodone (Vicodin and generic) and oxycodone (OxyContin, Percocet and generic).

Best use: For severe acute pain after surgery or from serious injuries.

Safety smarts: Start with the lowest dose and use for only a few days. If pain persists, ask your doctor about non-opioid alternatives.

Muscle relaxers

These prescription drugs include cyclobenzaprine (Amrix, Fexmid and generic), metaxalone (Skelaxin and generic) and carisoprodol (Soma and generic).

Best use: For acute, severe neck or back spasms; muscle spasticity associated with cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis or a stroke; or if you have liver disease and can’t tolerate OTC painkillers.

Safety smarts: Muscle relaxers can cause sedation and be addictive, and are only marginally effec­tive. They’re also associated with a higher fall risk for older adults. Most people are better off skipping them. If you use them, do so for no longer than three weeks.

Nondrug options

Nondrug treatments can reduce pain and improve function. Ask your doctor about the following:

For back pain: Gentle movement — swimming, tai chi, walking and some forms of yoga — can be helpful. Acupuncture, massage, physical therapy and spinal manipulation (preferably by a chiropractor or osteopathic physician) are also good options.

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Why Does My Back Hurt When When I Have My Period?

Lower back pain during the period is caused by contractions in your uterus. And yes, you do have contractions during your period, as well as during childbirth. These ones are just much, much smaller, thank goodness.

The contractions in your uterus travel through the nerves in your pelvic region. More specifically, when your uterine lining is shedding (via the contractions), nearby blood vessels are also contracting, thus limiting the amount of oxygen that reaches nearby muscles and causing ensuing cramping.

Put simply, your uterus emits a series of “squeezes” to shed its uterine lining, and this can trigger soreness in nearby areas of the body, like your lower back. It also explains why your abdomen and thighs can feel sore after a period, like you’ve just worked out.

If you feel comfortable engaging in a little physical activity, getting the blood flowing is a great way to relieve a sore back, since it derives from a lack of oxygen flowing to the muscles. Going on a light jog could help your body loosen up and relax the muscles, too. Better yet, a hot yoga class (or a regular yoga class, because let’s be real, sometimes the hot one is straight torture) will do wonders for the more tense parts of your body.

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